Home News Pharaoh: A New Era lifts the veil on its soundtrack

Pharaoh: A New Era lifts the veil on its soundtrack

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Twenty-two years after the release of Pharaoh, discover the behind-the-scenes video of the musical reochestralization of the Pharaoh remake: A New Era.

One of the most popular city builder is back. Editor Dotemu and the development studio Triskell Interactive reveal a new video around the Pharaoh remake: A New Era.

This making of reveals the efforts made to rework and re-orchestrate the soundtrack of this famous management game. The use of‘traditional instruments from ancient Egypt allows to focus onauthenticity of musical tracks. the composer Louis Godart and the co-founder of Triskell Interactive Théophile Noiré come back to the development and desire to immerse players in the heart of Egyptian civilization.

The author also testifies to the work done by his team in order to best stick to Egyptian culture, thanks to discussions with consultants familiar with it.

During the creative process, Louis godart was in close connection with Keith Zizza, the composer of the original game in order to perfectly transcribe the1999 title spirit.

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This remake includes all the elements of this classic management game by incorporating 2D graphics in 4K, a revamped user interface and redesigned mechanics. During the campaign, we will be able to explore the history ofAncient Egypt through 6 distinct periods and build what will become the lush and magnificent capital of this civilization.

Pharaoh: A New Era will also includeCleopatra: Queen of the Nile expansion released in 2000, enriching the base game with more than 100 hours of play, 53 missions, a map and mission editor as well as a Free Build mode.

We look forward to the release of Pharaoh: A New Era, scheduled for 2022 on PC in order to immerse us in the ancient kingdom of Egypt.

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